Everything Worth Knowing Rescue News Weekend Edition March 31, 2013

Until Next Time Remember

WE ARE THEIR VOICE!

Everydogsmom

Advertisements

4 thoughts on “Everything Worth Knowing Rescue News Weekend Edition March 31, 2013

  1. “Have been at it as well for over 50+ years. The one thing that is not being addressed isn’t so much the ‘second chance”, injured/sick animals, it is that perfect dogs/cats are being euthanized daily while the ones that are in bad shape get rescued and hundreds/thousands of $$ are spent on their rehab. Something is wrong with this mindset/picture. …”

    I said this for decades and I was accused of many things, including being elitist and heartless. I finally gave up. Too many people think that the adorable perfectly healthy pet will be adopted by someone else, so they take the one with special needs, or one that is just not quite so perfect as the other, and sometimes even the one that needs thousands of $ spent on surgery and/or rehab. They can’t wrap their mind around the truth that we have killed millions of perfectly healthy pets because we produce millions EVERY year that there are NO homes for!

    Shelter personnel have an extremely difficult job, especially when they have to kill perfectly healthy animals. It is not quite so bad when they know the animal has serious behavior or health issues that would cost more than they make in a week, or a month, or a year to resolve. It’s still difficult, but it is a little easier to accept.

    I do not think that the solution is to necessarily “regulate breeding” but rather to remove the profit. Something like mandatory registration and chipping of every dog/cat born. A $200 fee for registration which must be done within 4 weeks of birth, with half the fee refunded upon submission of proof of neutering before they are 5 months old. (Breeders can build this fee into their prices and encourage the buyers to get the $100 back for neutering.) Any pup born to a female younger than 2 years old will cost an additional $100 to register. After the female turns 3 years old year the initial registration fee of $200 increases by 50% every year until the animal is neutered. Neutered animals are registered annually for $10. Any un-neutered animal found as a stray that can be traced back to their breeder, will be returned to the current owner. BUT, the breeder and the original person who registered the animal, will be named on a list of past owners that were responsible for a “stray”. Every time one is found, a number is added to their name and annually the list is posted online with the number following their name indicating the number of strays they produced in the post year. (Encourages them to be more careful of where that pup goes.) All currently existing pets over the age of 7 years would be exempt from the neutering penalty but would have to be registered and any offspring produced also registered under the new provisions. The $ generated should be plenty to pay for all of the program and enforcement costs.

    I’d also like to see a stipulation that in order to be licensed to practice in the state every vet be required to donate 1% of their gross receipts, or 5 free neuter procedures (which ever is greater), the first Wed of every month until all currently existing animals are neutered and there are no more unwanted animals. The animals can be chosen by lottery from applicants to the registration program supervisor.

    There would be numerous animal groups threatening any supporter of this, especially the AKC, UKC, and all other registration organizations, because it would cut into the profit they make from registering all of the litters produced every year. (Many of the same animals that wind up being killed.) Puppy mills would fight to be exempt and to keep their names off of the registration records and chips. Brokers who sell the puppy mill dogs would also fight this and refuse to have their names associated with any of the records. I expect even the Humane Society would be against it. BUT, if enough of us were for it, pushed our elected officials, were vocal and organized, it could be done. Anything short of that will fail to pass and anything short of those $ penalties will not do much to curb the breeding of millions more dogs and cats doomed to die.

    In the meantime, we can all try to pick the dogs and cats that are healthy, happy and well adjusted. Keep in mind that due to our kind hearts, we will still be drawn to the pitiful ones, and sometimes let our heart over rule our minds, and rescue one of those. Just try to remember, all things being equal, the one you don’t pick out of a high kill shelter will likely die. Remember, we are spending millions on unwanted dogs and cats, saving dogs and cats with issues, while healthy animals die every day. We all do the best we can for the ones others have abandoned and that really is all we can do, because we certainly can’t save them all.

  2. RE: your above comment ^^^^^:

    Have been at it as well for over 50+ years. The one thing that is not being addressed isn’t so much the ‘second chance”, injured/sick animals, it is that perfect dogs/cats are being euthanized daily while the ones that are in bad shape get rescued and hundreds/thousands of $$ are spent on their rehab. Something is wrong with this mindset/picture. Are we just becoming a country of bleeding hearts who support the down-trodden and forget that these are all second chance sentient beings in these pounds/shelters?

    NYC ACCs are the worst in our country for euthanizing perfectly healthy, deserving animals, especially dogs each and every day!

    • That isn’t a comment it is a brief description of the person who writes this blog(me) When I say that I give an animal a second chance at life I don’t mean JUST the downtrodden animals that are in bad shape. We take in ANY animal that needs a second chance. You are American judging from your comment about NYC ACC, and what you say is true, thousands of healthy animals are euthanized in shelters in the US everyday. However, there are equally as many elderly and sick dogs euthanized. NO dog should be euthanized because it was discarded. This problem of dogs being killed in shelters can not be laid at the feet of rescuers whether they are pulling sick dogs or healthy ones. The overpopulation problem that currently exists is a worldwide phenomena caused by the overbreeding of animals for profit. Until we regulate breeding, the tide of innocent animals slaughtered by humans on a daily basis will not be stopped.

Comments are closed.